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Apr
23
3 Reasons Why Losing Estrogen Makes You Old
By Dr LaKeischa


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Hello Hormone Hotties! This month our adventures in perimenopause and menopause have taken us into the world of one of the big 3 hormones, Estrogen. Today we will look into 3 reasons why you could start looking like a Sher Peri, you know what I mean…the wrinkles. If you are just finding me for the first time, I'm Dr. LaKeischa, your Integrative Gynecologist, hormone specialist, speaker, and best-selling author. I help ambitious women, like you, who are struggling with depleting hormones get your hormones balanced, regain mental sharpness, have energy all day, and remember just how beautiful and vital you are!


Today’s chat is going to help you understand why you start looking your age when you go into perimenopause and menopause. The following are 3 areas of the skin that are affected when estrogen starts decreasing.



1. Estrogen and Collagen


Most of us remember our sweet grandmother, older aunt, or the older family friend who had that paper-thin skin. I mean you could see her blue veins and red arteries pumping the blood right below the surface. Her skin was so thin you were afraid that if you touched her skin too hard it would rub right off! The other thought that ran through your mind was, “will this happen to me?” “Will my skin get so paper-thin that you can see the nutrients coursing through my veins?”


So why can this happen? There were several studies done that showed that a critical component of our skin that makes up the thickness and structural support of our skin is known as collagen. There are up to 14 types of collagen found in the skin and some studies have found when estrogen decreases it affects the skin’s ability to turn over collagen like it used to when there was more estrogen on board and helps with the integrity of the skin. The bottom line, when estrogen starts falling the foundation is not as strong as it used to be.




2. Estrogen and Moisture


Hydration, Hydration, Hydration. We hear this all the time and we try everything to get our water intake up to snuff. Well, what if I told you that once you go into perimenopause and menopause you could drink water all day and still have challenges with getting your skin as moisturized as you would like it to be. What?! Yes, that’s right. Estrogen is what helped increase the water content in your skin. Estrogen helps to increase a molecule called hyaluronic acid and then allows your skin to have a higher water holding capacity. When this is in tack your skin can have more luminosity. In simplest terms, it makes you look younger.



3. Estrogen and Wrinkles


When it comes to how estrogen prevents wrinkles from forming we have to take the conversation back to the structure of the skin. There have been studies that show wrinkles occur when the thickness of the skin decreases. When the thickness decreases then the elastic fibers in the middle layer of the skin are affected. That means the foundation is beginning to crumble (no pun intended). J So how does estrogen help slow down the aging process?



Estrogen increases that molecule with the long name (you know doctors love big words, makes us feel like our education was worth it), hyaluronic acid. Hyaluronic acid helps to increase the skin's water-holding capacity and in turn improves the skin turgor. Now, what is that? Skin turgor is the skin’s bounce-back factor. And with the skin being the largest organ of the body, estrogen also helps with the skin’s protective mechanism. Having intact skin is paramount in keeping out pathogens (you know, the bad guys). This means the ability to prevent infections and even healing can be influenced by having estrogen on board.



Now, that we know a few of the major benefits that estrogen has on our skin how can we treat our skin with some TLC as we glide into perimenopause and menopause?



Besides a great skincare routine, what else can contribute to maintaining or even restoring the health of your skin? Bio-identical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT). Say, what? How does BHRT play into all of this? Using BHRT can help increase falling estrogen levels and in turn affect the skin's structure, turgor (bounce-back factor), and the skin’s ability to protect from harm.



Did we just find the fountain of youth? I wouldn’t go that far. What you found today was information. Information to help you understand the subtle changes you started noticing are not in your head. You are not being self-absorbed when you are concerned about the health of your skin, which is part of taking care of the whole of you. You remember how your skin looked, felt, and rebounded from the elements and it’s changing.



So, Hormone Hotties, take this info and put it in your growing library of information that you are curating to help you navigate this phase of your life with ease. Remember you are not alone. I know some of you are wondering if the symptoms you are experiencing should be addressed by a doctor. Take your free hormone quiz and start creating your hormone blueprint, and until next time, give yourself and others grace.







CONTACT DR. LAKEISCHA 
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MEDICAL DISCLAIMER: ALL INFORMATION PROVIDED BY DR. LAKEISCHA MAY ON THIS WEBSITE OR IN ANY OTHER FORMAT IS FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE, DIAGNOSIS, OR TREATMENT. ALWAYS CONSULT YOUR PERSONAL PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH PROVIDER WITH ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE REGARDING A MEDICAL CONDITION. NEVER REPLACE PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE GIVEN TO YOU PERSONALLY OR DELAY IN SEEKING IT BECAUSE OF SOMETHING YOU HAVE READ ON THIS WEBSITE. THIS INFORMATION IS NOT MEANT TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, OR CURE ANY MEDICAL CONDITION.